Exhibition Update: Opening Night Details

 

As you already know, my artwork (including the below portrait titled "Hope") will be on display at Freshy’s in West Seattle during the month of May. But, it’s also important to know that May 1 is opening night! Be sure to drop by between 6 and 8:30 p.m. to enjoy some art and delicious beer. :)

Daisy_Persian.png

Iranian & Inspired

This was probably because I had spent the last few days reading all about the protests going on lately in Iran, but when I drew my latest portrait this morning I found that the girl looked very Iranian. I had specifically been reading about Vida Movahed and the other "Girls of Enghelab Street," women who have protested the headscarf by each publicly taking hers off and waving it in the air to the crowd. All I could think about was how incredibly brave these women were and I suppose that sort of came through as I was drawing the portrait.

Stay tuned for when I add an Adobe Illustrator-esque touch to the piece ...

IranianGirl.jpg

It's All in the Eyes

Originally posted on January 8, 2016.

Lately, I've noticed a pattern in my drawings (which I assume you've already noticed by now): I usually end up drawing close-up portraits of young women who are not smiling (and if they are smiling it's barely noticeable). They wear intense expressions especially around the eyes, which is the facial feature I focus on the most while I draw. Each time I come across this realization, I ask myself why it's true.

The only possible answer I can think of is this: I identify myself somehow with each of these women, in obvious and not so obvious ways. In obvious terms, I am a young female. When I dive deeper into analysis, I decide I am a vessel full of emotions, usually intense ones (both positive and negative). And, I have always believed that a person's eyes speak volumes including my own (I've been told time and time again that I have no capacity for a poker face and that therefore one can see what I'm feeling especially by looking at my eyes).

I guess, as it turns out, while I am drawing and wondering what the young women are possibly thinking, I am also reflecting on myself and what my own thoughts are. And, I guess that's part of being an artist: figuring out who you really are and how you relate to the world around you. This isn't to say I think this is the only purpose of being an artist as I believe other purposes include breaking the rules (like what society deems as "art"), sharing stories and, simply, expressing what you're feeling in the moment you're creating the art.

What are your thoughts? What do you think is the main purpose of making art? Do you believe there is only one major reason to be an artist?

Signing off,

Shirene

Pablo Picasso, Take the Wheel

Originally posted on December 19, 2015.

6353790.jpg

Usually, when it has come to the steps of drawing a piece, posting it on the home page of my site and listening to people's reactions, I've found it all exciting. I'm always fascinated by how people can have totally different interpretations about one drawing. This morning, however, I decided to take on a refreshing approach: I decided to draw purely for the sake of drawing... which led to the picture you see here.

Specifically, I wanted to try drawing without mentally preparing myself for people's opinions. I didn't want to think about the moment where I reveal my piece to the public, to eyes other than my own. Also, I wanted to focus on the experiment of speed drawing since I usually take my time when I draw.

So, here is my finished piece (above). It may not be much (one eye is slightly above the other, the nose is too wide...) and it may not look like the previous pieces I've done, but it's something I created.

I'd like to finish this blog post with a quote from one of my favorite artists:

"Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon." ~Pablo Picasso